Saturday, August 19

10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Art Events and Performances

Location: Fairbanks Hall and Gallery 

Get specific times and locations here

Visit “Totality”, an art exhibition emphasizing lyrical, conceptual, scientific, fantasy, and historic responses to the universe or to humankind’s space exploration. Location: Fairbanks Gallery

Drop by to see cosmic-inspired mural painting with artist Johnny Beaver as he develops his mural over the weekend. Location: West Gallery, Fairbanks Hall

Special activities:
Mono-printing, one of the easiest forms of printmaking to learn, with Angie Parrott Purviance
Storytelling with Eric Dickey, author of the children’s book Alex the Ant Goes to the Beach
Creating sun-prints (cyanotype photograms) with Amanda Burnett using the sun (UV light) for exposure and featuring nature and other materials
Gallery tour with curator Julia Bradshaw, describing the artworks and projects exhibited and the process of assembling works to show that artists have a broad relationship to the Cosmos
Cosmic performance art by Kaitlyn Wittig Mengüç, employing light and shadow to imagine an expedition to outer space
Poetry writing workshop with Qwo-Li Driskill, helping writers with original poetry centering the knowledges we gain from our relationship with the sky and stars
Constellation-themed painting workshop with Caroline Moses
Audio/visual performance by Mike Gamble and Ryan Biesack connecting solo guitar, electronics and projections in an improvised set that reflects the overall theme of totality

10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Hands-on and Experiential Activities

Location: Memorial Union and adjacent covered Plaza

Rockets:  View high-altitude rockets built by students from Oregon State’s award-winning AIAA Club. (American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics) and hear what it takes to launch a rocket 100,000 feet in the air. Location: Memorial Union Quad (outdoors)

Robots: See Oregon State’s award-winning Mars Rover replica, an underwater robot and other innovations, while chatting with the OSU Robotics Club members who created them. Location: Memorial Union Quad (outdoors)

Meteorite Petting Zoo: Have you ever held a meteorite? If not, here's your chance. Dick Pugh, a world-renowned meteorite scientist with the Cascadia Meteorite Laboratory in Portland, will share his meteorite collection and offer a "petting zoo" of several to pick up and handle. You can also bring suspected meteorites for him to evaluate for authenticity.
Location: Memorial Union, Room 109 (main floor) 

Fun with Physics: Try an "angular momentum chair" to experience the principle of angular momentum with your own body. Location: Memorial Union, Room 109 (main floor)

Make a "Solar Cookie": Decorate a cookie to make an edible model of the sun and learn about features of the sun's outer layers. Location: Plaza next to Memorial Union

Creation Station: Make an eclipse viewer or get creative with other eclipse-related arts and crafts projects. All ages are welcome! Location: Memorial Union Commons (downstairs)

Stellar Fingerprinting: Identify what stars are made of using an amazing "stellar fingerprinting" process. Location: Memorial Union Horizon Room (mezzanine level)

Exploring the Sun, Moon and Stars: See how the sun and moon align to create an eclipse and follow its path. Location: Memorial Union Multipurpose Room (downstairs) 

10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Learn from the experts
Grab a front row seat as Oregon State faculty, students and special guests share their knowledge and experience.

Sessions will last about 45 minutes, including Q&A

Location: LaSells Stewart Center, Austin Auditorium and Construction Engineering Hall

 

10:00 a.m. 
40 Years in Space Without Leaving the Ground
Bone Research Lab Director Russell Turner doesn’t limit his work to our planet. He’s been conducting experiments on spaceflight missions since the 1970s to study how microgravity affects bones. Hear about his adventures, mishaps and findings – and how his pioneering bone research out there applies to wellness and strong bones for the Earthbound.Room: Austin Auditorium  

Greeks and the Eclipse: A Geometry Story
Thousands of years ago, Greeks learned to use eclipse events and geometry to measure the size and distance to both the moon and the sun with surprising accuracy. Learn from mathematics PhD candidate Sarah Hagen how the ancient Greeks made such astounding measurements, and leave with the tools to do it yourself. No math background required. Room: Construction and Engineering Hall

11:00 a.m.
Total Eclipse of the Art:  How Artists Visualize the Sun, Moon and Cosmos
In this illustrated lecture, art historian Dr. Liena Vayzman will consider ways that historical and contemporary artists have imagined and visualized the cosmos, particularly the sun and moon – easily observable by humans and the subject of myth-making, speculation and worship in many cultures. Room: Austin Auditorum

The North Star, a Guiding Light to African American Freedom
Ethnic studies professor Robert Thompson discusses how astronomy played an important role in the African American culture, helping slaves navigate to freedom. Room: Construction and Engineering Hall

1:00 p.m.
Sports and STEM
Meet some of the Beaver Nation athletes who are pursuing degrees in STEM (science, technology, engineering, math). Hear how these future innovators are combining their passions for athletics and academics to make an impact. Room: Austin Auditorum

2:00 p.m.
Is There Life Elsewhere in the Universe?  
This age-long question has yet to be answered, but there’s evidence from the NASA Curiosity Rover that Mars could have supported life in the past. Hear fascinating insights from expert Martin Fisk, a Participating Scientist in NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory Program (Curiosity Rover), about whether life exists on other planets – and if so, how we might find it. Room: Austin Auditorum

View from the Coast
During the eclipse, a vast network of sensors on oceanographic moorings off the Oregon Coast will be measuring its effect on the ocean through tides. Hear from oceanographer/professor Jonathan Fram about how bioacoustic sonars will measure fish and the zooplankton they eat, while other sensors will detect how the eclipse affects light and temperature at the sea surface. Room: Construction and Engineering Hall

3:00 p.m.
Not Rocket Science? Yes, It Is!
Lift-off! This is rocket science. Hear how Oregon State University students on the High Altitude Rocket Team built a rocket to reach 100,000 ft. Room: Austin Auditorium

4:00 p.m. 
There Goes the Sun: An Overview of the "Great American Eclipse of 2017"
Learn all about the Total Solar Eclipse from expert Randall Milstein, Astronomer-in-Residence to the Oregon NASA Space Grant Consortium and an OSU physics professor. Enjoy his educational and entertaining stories of the mythology, history, science and beauty of this rare celestial event. Room: Austin Auditorium

Noon – 8:00 p.m.

BBQ and Beverages in the Courtyard
Location: LaSells Stewart Center Courtyard

Relax, socialize and enjoy beer, wine and food for purchase starting at noon. BBQ by Pig Out BBQ catering from 4-7 p.m.

Evening Entertainment

7:00 p.m.

OSU Choir Concert
The Path of Totality: Singing of Darkness and Light 
Location: LaSells Stewart Center - Austin Auditorium

Featuring a special repertoire chosen especially for this historic occasion, the OSU Summer Choir will perform choruses from Israel and Egypt, Samson and Creation, accompanied by the OSU Summer Orchestra.

Advance tickets available at: http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/SACevents 
$10 general admission; Free for K-12 and OSU students (with ID) and lodging guests. 

8:30 – 11:00 p.m.

Movie Under the Stars
Apollo-13 (PG)

Location: Memorial Union Quad

Grab some popcorn and watch “Apollo 13” (PG), a drama based on what was expected to be the third lunar-landing mission. This compelling true story of averted tragedy and heroism shows the creativity of the scientists who ran the early space missions. Seating is on the lawn, so bring a blanket or low chairs. Snacks and non-alcoholic beverages available for purchase.

9:30 – 11:00 p.m.

Starry Nights: Stargazing with Astronomers

Location: Peavy Field
(30th St. and Jefferson Way) 

Take advantage of the moonless sky to view the stars through advanced telescopes, guided by Randall Milstein, OSU Professor and Astronomer-in-Residence to the Oregon NASA Space Grant Consortium plus local astronomy club members (weather permitting).

 

Sunday, August 20

10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Art Events and Performances

Location: Fairbanks Hall and Gallery 

Get specific times and locations here

Visit “Totality”, an art exhibition emphasizing lyrical, conceptual, scientific, fantasy, and historic responses to the universe or to humankind’s space exploration. Location: Fairbanks Gallery

Drop by to see cosmic-inspired mural painting with artist Johnny Beaver as he develops his mural over the weekend. Location: West Gallery, Fairbanks Hall

Special activities:
Astronomical button-making with Shar Fagerston, using images from old astronomy magazines
Storytelling with Eric Dickey, author of the children’s book Alex the Ant Goes to the Beach
Creating sun-prints (cyanotype photograms) with Amanda Burnett using the sun (UV light) for exposure and featuring nature and other materials
Gallery tour with curator Julia Bradshaw, describing the artworks and projects exhibited and the process of assembling works to show that artists have a broad relationship to the Cosmos
Cosmic performance art by Kaitlyn Wittig Mengüç, employing light and shadow to imagine an expedition to outer space
Poetry writing workshop with Qwo-Li Driskill, helping writers with original poetry centering the knowledges we gain from our relationship with the sky and stars
Constellation-themed painting workshop with Caroline Moses
Audio/visual performance by Mike Gamble and Ryan Biesack connecting solo guitar, electronics and projections in an improvised set that reflects the overall theme of totality

10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Hands-on and Experiential Activities

Location: Memorial Union and adjacent covered Plaza

Rockets:  View high-altitude rockets built by students from Oregon State’s award-winning AIAA Club. (American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics) and hear what it takes to launch a rocket 100,000 feet in the air. Location: Memorial Union Quad (outdoors)

Robots: See Oregon State’s award-winning Mars Rover replica, an underwater robot and other innovations, while chatting with the OSU Robotics Club members who created them. Location: Memorial Union Quad (outdoors)

Meteorite Petting Zoo: Have you ever held a meteorite? If not, here's your chance. Dick Pugh, a world-renowned meteorite scientist with the Cascadia Meteorite Laboratory in Portland, will share his meteorite collection and offer a "petting zoo" of several to pick up and handle. You can also bring suspected meteorites for him to evaluate for authenticity.
Location: Memorial Union, Room 109 (main floor) 

Fun with Physics: Try an "angular momentum chair" to experience the principle of angular momentum with your own body. Location: Memorial Union, Room 109 (main floor)

Make a "Solar Cookie": Decorate a cookie to make an edible model of the sun and learn about features of the sun's outer layers. Location: Plaza next to Memorial Union

Creation Station: Make an eclipse viewer or get creative with other eclipse-related arts and crafts projects. All ages are welcome! Location: Memorial Union Commons (downstairs)

Stellar Fingerprinting: Identify what stars are made of using an amazing "stellar fingerprinting" process. Location: Memorial Union Horizon Room (mezzanine level)

Exploring the Sun, Moon and Stars: See how the sun and moon align to create an eclipse and follow its path. Location: Memorial Union Multipurpose Room (downstairs) 

2:00 p.m.– 4:00 p.m.

Make an Eclipse Viewer 

Location: Buxton Hall, Business DamLab Makerspace

Make your own eclipse viewer in the Business DamLab makerspace and meet the Dean of the College of Business, Mitzi Montoya. RSVP to maria.schell@oregonstate.edu.

10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Learn from the Experts
Grab a front row seat as Oregon State faculty and students share their knowledge and experience.

Sessions will last about 45 minutes, including Q&A

Location: LaSells Stewart Center

10:00 a.m. 
40 Years in Space Without Leaving the Ground
Bone Research Lab Director Russell Turner doesn’t limit his work to our planet. He’s been conducting experiments on spaceflight missions since the 1970s to study how microgravity affects bones. Hear about his adventures, mishaps and findings – and how his pioneering bone research out there applies to wellness and strong bones for the Earthbound. 
Room: Austin Auditorium  

El Impacto del Eclipse Solar en la Naturaleza (Presented in Spanish by Gabriel Jaime Gómez Carder, former director of the Planetarium of Medellín in Colombia; simultaneous English translation.)
Un eclipse total de Sol es una buena oportunidad para registrar los cambios meteorológicos que ocurren durante dicho fenómeno astronómico. Hay cambios de luminosidad en el ambiente, descenso de la temperatura, cambio en la dirección del viento, cambio en el comportamiento de los animales, oscurecimiento del cielo y aparición de las estrellas y planetas. Pero el impacto más impresionante es la sensibilidad humana. Para saber esto hay que vivirlo! 
The Impact of a Solar Eclipse in Nature
A total solar eclipse is a good opportunity to record meteorological changes that occur during this astronomical phenomenon, such as luminosity, temperature, wind direction, animal behavior, darkening of the sky and appearance of the stars and planets. But the most impressive impact is human sensitivity. To know this you have to live it!
Room: Construction and Engineering Hall

11:00 a.m.
Total Eclipse of the Art:  How Artists Visualize the Sun, Moon and Cosmos
In this illustrated lecture, art historian Dr. Liena Vayzman will consider ways that historical and contemporary artists have imagined and visualized the cosmos, particularly the sun and moon – easily observable by humans and the subject of myth-making, speculation and worship in many cultures. Room: Austin Auditorum

The North Star, a Guiding Light to African American Freedom
Ethnic studies professor Robert Thompson discusses how astronomy played an important role in the African American culture, helping slaves navigate to freedom. Room: Construction and Engineering Hall

12:00 p.m.
The Violent Universe: Waiting for Starlight
Explore the amazing phenomena of gamma ray bursts, the brightest explosions in the Universe, with astrophysicist and astronomy expert Davide LazzatiRoom: Austin Auditorium

1:00 p.m.
Is There Life Elsewhere in the Universe?  
This age-long question has yet to be answered, but there’s evidence from the NASA Curiosity Rover that Mars could have supported life in the past. Hear fascinating insights from expert Martin Fisk, a Participating Scientist in NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory Program (Curiosity Rover), about whether life exists on other planets – and if so, how we might find it. Room: Austin Auditorium

2:00 p.m.
Not Rocket Science? Yes, It Is!
Lift-off! This is rocket science. Hear how Oregon State University students on the High Altitude Rocket Team built a rocket to reach 100,000 ft. Room: Austin Auditorium

3:00 p.m
There Goes the Sun: An Overview of the "Great American Eclipse of 2017"
Learn all about the Total Solar Eclipse from expert Randall Milstein, Astronomer-in-Residence to the Oregon NASA Space Grant Consortium and an OSU physics professor. Enjoy his educational and entertaining stories of the mythology, history, science and beauty of this rare celestial event. Room: Austin Auditorium

4:00 p.m.
View from the Coast
During the eclipse, a vast network of sensors on oceanographic moorings off the Oregon Coast will be measuring its effect on the ocean through tides. Hear from oceanographer/professor Jonathan Fram about how bioacoustic sonars will measure fish and the zooplankton they eat, while other sensors will detect how the eclipse affects light and temperature at the sea surface. Room: Austin Auditorium

5:00 p.m.
El Eclipse Total de Sol a Través del Arte (Presented in Spanish by Gabriel Jaime Gómez Carder, former director of the Planetarium of Medellín in Colombia; simultaneous English translation.)
Los eclipses tanto de Sol como de Luna han impactado al hombre a través de toda su historia pero sin duda el más impresionante de los fenómenos naturales es el eclipse total de Sol registrado en el arte a través de la literatura, la historia, la pintura, el grabado, y más recientemente a través de la fotografía.
The Total Eclipse and Art
The eclipses of both Sun and Moon have impacted man throughout history, but undoubtedly the most impressive is the total eclipse of Sun recorded in art through literature, history, painting, engraving, and more recently through photography.
Room: Construction and Engineering Hall

Noon –8:00 p.m.

BBQ and Beverages in the Courtyard
Location: LaSells Stewart Center Courtyard

Relax, socialize and enjoy beer, wine and food for purchase starting at noon. BBQ by Pig Out BBQ catering from 4-7 p.m.

Evening Entertainment

7:30 – 10:30 p.m.

Music on the Quad
Outdoor Classic Rock and Blues Concert

Location: Memorial Union Quad

Tickets on sale now

Wrap up the Total Solar Eclipse weekend celebration with an outdoor concert. Enjoy popular local artists The Plaehn-Hino Blues Band sharing their own distinct blend of acoustic and electric blues, folk and original material. Then dance, sing and reminisce with award-winning classic rock and soul blues band Lady Dottie and the Diamonds performing hits from Stevie Wonder, Buddy Holly, Otis Redding and more.

Buy concert tickets in advance at TicketTomato.com.
$15 general admission; free for OSU students with ID and children under 10. 
(Tickets included in Eclipse Lodging package)

Beer, wine and food available for purchase. Bring blankets or low lawn chairs for seating. 

9:30 – 11:00 p.m.

Starry Nights: Stargazing with Astronomers
Location: Peavy Field
(30th St. and Jefferson Way) 

Take advantage of the moonless sky to view the stars through advanced telescopes, guided by Randall Milstein, OSU Professor and Astronomer-in-Residence to the Oregon NASA Space Grant Consortium plus local astronomy club members (weather permitting)

 

Monday, Aug. 21 – Eclipse Watching Party
A total solar eclipse is a rare natural phenomenon that most people will experience only once in a lifetime. As totality approaches, you will see the astonishing sight of day turning to night and the Sun's corona blazing in the sky.

Experience the total solar eclipse from Student Legacy Park, a great viewing location on campus, and get free solar eclipse glasses (while supplies last, 6,000+ pair available).  Our glasses are manufactured by an approved U.S. vendor, Rainbow Symphony, and meet the requirement for ISO 12312-2.

Oregon State’s Corvallis campus is in the path of totality, where the sky will go dark for about 2 minutes just before 10:17 a.m. Join the party as the moon begins covering the sun at about 9:00 a.m., and enjoy outdoor games and activities for the family. Please bring blankets for seating (chairs with sharp edges not allowed on turf field). No animals, weapons, food, glass containers, sharp objects, smoking or tobacco products allowed. 

Free parking available on a first-come, first-served basis; parking permits will not be required (no RVs or camping).

Oregon State University Celebrates its 150th Anniversary
The eclipse event marks the first of four festivals this year celebrating 150 years of Oregon State University educating and engaging our world. The OSU150 Space Grant Festival highlights Oregon State’s leadership, excellence and innovation in aerospace-related fields and its lead role for the Oregon NASA Space Grant.